sort of attractive?

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canyon penstemon
penstemon pseudospecabilis
scrophulariaceae

  • plants 2'x2', flowers spikes to 3'

  • PERENNIAL

  • regular to moderate water (low to terrace zones)

  • FULL SUN TO PART SHADE

  • HARDY TO ABOUT MID -20º F

  • rose-purple spikes usually February - June

  • NECTAR PLANT FOR BUTTERFLIES AND INSECTS

Who knows how much mescal botanists had when they named this plant. The latin name for canyon penstemon is Penstemon pseudospectabilis. The species name translates to "kind of attractive". But don't let drunk botanists prejudice you, seen in isolation, or mixed with other penstemons, this species is no less pretty than any other. 

WIth penstemons, we suggest you plant as many species as possible so as to extend and differentiate your blooming season--different penstemons bloom at different times, with slightly different colors. It is important to keep your hummers happy throughout the season is important (yes, you probably already know this is a hummingbird magnet). 

Specifically, canyon penstemon blooms with three-foot, rose-purple spikes usually February - June. Plants get about 2' tall and wide, and are evergreen with glossy green, serrated leaves. Prune back spent flowers at the end of the season or if you don't care about plants re-seeding, as each spike is spent. Pruning spent spikes can prolong the blooming period of your particular plant. 

All penstemons love well-drained soil. Full to part sun is best. Mix in with other flowering native plants for a native wild garden effect, and to keep pollinators happy. 

Plants are important nectar-producing plants for all sorts of critters. Penstemons have been demonstrably important to native bees. 

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Katherine Gierlach