the desert dweller with the golden eye

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Parish's goldeneye
Bahiopsis parishii
asteraceae

  • forms a shrub 4' x 4'

  • moderate to low water (terrace to top zone)

  • FULL SUN 

  • HARDY TO ABOUT MID 15º F

  • NECTAR PLANT FOR BUTTERFLIES, AND INSECTS

  • larval food plant for California and bordered patch butterflies

Parish's goldeneye (Bahiopsis parishii) is a dependable shrub that loves our desert heat. It has interesting sandpapery leaves contrasted by silvery-white stems; daisy flowers appear in spring, but more en masse in summer into fall (especially in response to monsoon rains). 

In the wild, it is found on plains, along arroyos, and slopes, always in xeric conditions below 5,000 feet in Arizona, California, Nevada, and south to Mexico (Baja California, Sonora) often associated with creosote bush. 

Provide well-drained soil, low to moderate water, and full sun. A fast grower, plants will grow to about 4' x 4'. Hardy to about 15º F it may be cut back in later winter to maintain a more dense and compact form.

California Patches (Chlosyne californica) and Bordered Parches (Chlosyne lacinia) use this desert plant as their larval host and the flowers provide nectar for all sorts of insects like native bees and adult butterflies. 

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Katherine Gierlach